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Posted on Feb 16, 2016 | 1 comment

UD Dedicates Martin Luther King Memorial

UD Dedicates Martin Luther King Memorial

Father Joe Kozar (left) and Rev. Daryl Ward (right) each gave a blessing at the dedication. Center:  Mike Brill.

Father Joe Kozar (left) and Rev. Daryl Ward (right) each gave a blessing at the dedication. Center: Mike Brill.

On a snowy night at the University of Dayton Fieldhouse in 1964, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., spoke to a crowd of more than 6,200 on race relations in America, housing, his commitment to nonviolence and the power of unconditional love.

The Fieldhouse is gone, replaced by Frericks Center. But on Friday, on a snowy afternoon, UD commemorated the speech with a permanent memorial near its site and near the school’s famed Immaculate Conception Chapel.

“It’s important for the University to have a visible memorial to the legacy of Dr. King and his historic speech on campus,” said UD President Daniel J. Curran. “This memorial will remind future generations of the University of Dayton community of Dr. King’s message and his legacy.”

Curran’s office and the office of Interim Provost Paul Benson sponsored the project initiated by art history professor Roger Crum, Graul Chair in Arts and Languages. Crum worked with Marianist brother and associate professor of art M. Gary Marcinowski on the concept and design. John Clarke, associate professor of art and design, designed the typography for the inscriptions.

The trio’s design honors King’s religious and ministerial roots. It features a black granite pulpit and bench with three bronze chairs.

The Martin luther King Jr. monument enveloped in snow.

The Martin luther King Jr. monument enveloped in snow.

The pulpit is the central feature of religious practice in King’s Baptist tradition, which was at the core of the Civil Rights movement, according to Crum. One chair represents King, the remaining two represent the community putting King’s message into action. The bench is intended to encourage reflection, especially for small gatherings and classes that might draw inspiration from King’s work.

“The memorial commemorates King’s visit to campus in 1964 and the daily work of the civil rights movement, but it also establishes an interesting dialogue with and a recollection of the collaboration between socially conscious Marianists and local and national civil rights leaders,” Crum said. “My hope is that when students consider the memorial they will come away with a deeper appreciation that King’s biography and the narrative of the civil rights movement were about more than key moments, such as the ‘I Have a Dream’ speech or the Selma to Montgomery march, or the garbage workers’ strike in Memphis.

“Instead, the memorial’s meaning is that the movement was more fundamentally about the daily work of communicating a developing message, much like King did when he spoke on campus in 1964.”

UD Art History professor Roger Crum, who initiated the project, talking to the press.

UD Art History professor Roger Crum, who initiated the project, talking to the press.

In December 2014, UD commemorated King’s speech by reflecting on race relations and social justice issues in America. Professor Emeritus Herbert Martin read excerpts of the speech transcribed from the only known audio recording, discovered in 2009 by filmmaker David Schock, who found it in a box in Martin’s garage while working on a documentary about him. Schock returned the tape to Martin, who donated it to the University.

Click here to listen to the complete speech or selected excerpts, Click here for more about Herbert Martin and the historic tape found in his garage. Click here for more about “Jump Back Honey,” the documentary about poet and retired UD professor Herbert Martin.

Photos by Larry Burgess, courtesy the University of Dayton,

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The memorial features a podium, three chairs, a bench (not visible) and  a low wall.

The memorial features a podium, three chairs, a bench (not visible) and a low wall.

1 Comment

  1. Also going on at UD, per the Cardinal Newman Society’s report: UD’s membership on a list of more than a quarter of residential Catholic colleges permit all-night opposite-sex visits on weekends, with only five of these colleges imposing restrictions on visiting hours during the week. “Whether intended or not, that’s an open invitation to sexual activity,” Wilson said.These Catholic colleges include University of Dayton
    – See more at: http://www.cardinalnewmansociety.org/CatholicEducationDaily/DetailsPage/tabid/102/ArticleID/4708/Visitation-Policies-at-Catholic-Colleges-Should-Promote-Chastity-Not-%E2%80%98Hook-Up%E2%80%99-Culture.aspx#sthash.fUL26niM.dpuf