Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted on Sep 14, 2016 |

NASA’s “Mohawk Guy” to Speak at UD this Month

NASA’s “Mohawk Guy” to Speak at UD this Month

Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Systems Engineer Bobak Ferdowsi is seen reacting after the MSL rover Curiosity successfully landed on Mars, Sunday, Aug. 5, 2012 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Ferdowski is known for changing his hair style for each mission or big event at JPL.  Curiosity was designed to assess whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbes.  Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Systems Engineer Bobak Ferdowsi, here reacting after the MSL rover Curiosity successfully landed on Mar in, 2012 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, is known for changing his hair style for each mssion. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls); via WikiMedia Commons.


A NASA engineer famous for his  hairstyle during the 2012 Mars Curiosity Rover landing will speak at the University of Dayton on Sept. 29.

 

Bobak Ferdowsi’s talk, “Who Knows What Evil Lurks Below the Surface: Exploring Alien Worlds With Robots,” at 6:30 p.m. in the Kennedy Union ballroom, is free and open to the public.

 

Ferdowski became a celebrity in 2012 when people saw his hair on NASA’s live feed of the Curiosity landing. President Barack Obama called him “Mohawk Guy” in a congratulatory call to NASA afterward, and the name stuck. Ferdowsi is currently a systems engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory working as a mission planner for NASA’s planned Europa mission.

 

Europa is a moon of Jupiter with a subsurface ocean, and scientists believe it may be home to microbial extraterrestrial life. The Europa Clipper will make multiple close flybys of the moon, sending images back to NASA and selecting a landing site for a future lander.

 

University of Dayton researchers have been involved in testing the system that could power the mission. Before his talk, Ferdowsi will tour the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (MMRTG) Lifecycle Testing Laboratory at the University of Dayton Research Institute. MMRTG technology powered the Curiosity rover, and will be used on the next rover mission to Mars in 2020. University researchers have been evaluating this technology for the harsh environments the system will encounter on Mars 2020, and on its way through deep space to Europa.

 

Tickets are not required for Ferdowsi’s talk. Parking is available without a permit in lots B and C only.

 

Photo of Mars Rover: NASA/JPL-Caltech; courtesy WikiMedia Commons.

 

Click here to see all our current stories and photos.