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Posted on Jun 28, 2013 | 1 comment

President Obama on the Supreme Court Decisions

President Obama on the Supreme Court Decisions

The White House Photo of the Day for June 27: President Obama on the phone with Edie Windsor, the plaintiff in the Defense of Marriage Act case the Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday. Photo by Pete Souza; courtesy the White House.

The White House Photo of the Day for June 27: President Obama on the phone with Edie Windsor, the plaintiff in the Defense of Marriage Act case the Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday. Photo by Pete Souza; courtesy the White House.

I applaud the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act. This was discrimination enshrined in law. It treated loving, committed gay and lesbian couples as a separate and lesser class of people. The Supreme Court has righted that wrong, and our country is better off for it. We are a people who declared that we are all created equal — and the love we commit to one another must be equal as well.

This ruling is a victory for couples who have long fought for equal treatment under the law; for children whose parents’ marriages will now be recognized, rightly, as legitimate; for families that, at long last, will get the respect and protection they deserve; and for friends and supporters who have wanted nothing more than to see their loved ones treated fairly and have worked hard to persuade their nation to change for the better.

So we welcome today’s decision, and I’ve directed the Attorney General to work with other members of my Cabinet to review all relevant federal statutes to ensure this decision, including its implications for Federal benefits and obligations, is implemented swiftly and smoothly.

On an issue as sensitive as this, knowing that Americans hold a wide range of views based on deeply held beliefs, maintaining our nation’s commitment to religious freedom is also vital.  How religious institutions define and consecrate marriage has always been up to those institutions.  Nothing about this decision – which applies only to civil marriages – changes that.

The laws of our land are catching up to the fundamental truth that millions of Americans hold in our hearts:  when all Americans are treated as equal, no matter who they are or whom they love, we are all more free.

Click here for the USCCB’s resource page on the Call to Prayer for Life, Marriage, and Religious Liberty — or click on the “Join the Movement” graphic on our site any time.

Click here to see our story on the two decisions and what they might mean. 

Click here for our Religious Liberty resources page. Click here to see all our previous stories and guest posts on religious liberty issues.

Click here to see all our current stories.

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1 Comment

  1. From http://www.Catholic.com:

    Could the Church ever change its position and allow homosexuals to marry?

    The answer is no.

    The reason homosexual acts are wrong is not simply that they take place outside of marriage, but that they are contrary to natural design. For various reasons, both inside and outside of their control, some people have desires that are not in accord with nature. When these desires are acted upon, the result is an unnatural and immoral act. Even if two homosexuals were “married,” they would still be having unnatural sex.

    The Church cannot change its teaching on marriage, which is grounded in natural law. Under natural law a man can marry only whom he was designed to marry: a woman. He cannot validly marry another man any more than he could an animal or a plant. Any attempted marriage between a man and another man would be invalid by definition. It might be recognized by the state as a legitimate marriage, but it would not be so before God.

    Courage, a nationwide Catholic organization set up to help homosexuals lead chaste lives. Their Web address of is: http://couragerc.net.